Archive Page 2

Brad’s Fast Shrimp and Pasta with Cream Sauce

A recipe by Brad Muir
Serves 4

My wife and I are out on the West coast visiting our youngest son (our middle son came up to visit from San Francisco) and we decided to have some shrimp and pasta for dinner. Off we went to the store to get the ingredients.
This recipe is one my middle son, Brad, developed in San Francisco. It is fast, easy, and tasty all at the same time. And, you do not have to slave over a hot stove.
Basically it uses frozen shrimp (pretty much the only way to buy shrimp unless you live next to a shrimp boat, but that’s another story), a jar of Alfredo sauce, and some pasta. There are some alteration to the ingredients and there are lots of variations you can make to this recipe. Check out some of the addition and variations at the end of the recipe.
This is another of those “open a jar” recipes, but speed and taste win over slaving over a stove.
This recipe is easily doubled or upped b y one and a half to fit the number of people you are feeding. And, it’s a good recipe to have in your back pocket when friends or family show up unexpectedly.

Recipe follows.
Continue reading ‘Brad’s Fast Shrimp and Pasta with Cream Sauce’

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Moist Pumpkin Raisin Bran Muffins – AKA Better Than Sex Muffins


Adapted from a King Arthur Flour Test Kitchen recipe
Makes 12 muffins

I have a lot of friends that just love pumpkin. Pumpkin in anything is a good thing. I like pumpkin, too; just not as much as these folks.
I have been baking many different kinds of muffins lately and I thought why not try a pumpkin muffin.
And the search was on.
I did not find many pumpkin muffin recipes. Some of them sounded awful. I tried one from Dorie Greenspan’s book Baking that was just okay. Then I ran across a recipe on the Internet from King Arthur Flour. One thing I liked about it was that it used a whole 15-ounce can of pumpkin puree. What do you do with a quarter can of pumpkin anyway?
In looking at the recipe it look familiar. It seemed close to the moist and tasty bran muffins I posted earlier (here). So I made some changed to the recipe using some tricks from that recipe.
It worked.
These are outstanding muffins. The pumpkin flavor comes through (a problem in many pumpkin recipes) and they are moist and tender – just a great combination. And as an added bonus, they are low calorie, low fat and high in fiber.
And they taste so good that a friend of mine renamed them “Better Than Sex Muffins!”
It fits.

Recipe follows.

Continue reading ‘Moist Pumpkin Raisin Bran Muffins – AKA Better Than Sex Muffins’

Amazing Margarita Cookies

Adapted from Dorie Greenspan’s Sablés au Citron
Makes about 50 cookies

These cookies are amazing. You bite into one thinking cookie. And it is a cookie. It’s sweet. But then the salt hits you and your brain says whoa!
Sweet and salty.
Then the lime and orange kick in. And your brain says whoa again…sweet, salty and citrus.
Then the slight hint of tequila hits you.
And your brain, totally confused, says, “Margarita cookie. I like.”
And you have another. And another.
These things are addictive.
I know you don’t believe me. No one believes me when I offer them a margarita cookie. Then they taste one and always want another.
Like I said, this is an amazing cookie.

Recipe follows.

Continue reading ‘Amazing Margarita Cookies’

Toasted Israeli Couscous with Grilled Vegetables and Lemon-Balsamic Vinaigrette


Adapted from a recipe by Bobby Flay

Serves 4 to 6

My late sister, Sue, was a vegetarian among other things. She was a great kid and I loved her dearly. One day, I called her up and said, “Let’s have dinner and I’ll cook, vegetarian of course.”
This is one of the dishes I prepared and it was so good I have made it several times for my family and friends. Grilled vegetables are what make it. The slightly smoky flavor comes through and the lemon balsamic vinaigrette adds a nice counterpoint to the whole dish.
If you have never tried couscous, I suggest you do. This recipe uses Israeli couscous (also known as pearl couscous) which is slightly larger than normal couscous. I like them both, but the larger Israeli couscous is very tasty.

Recipe follows.
Continue reading ‘Toasted Israeli Couscous with Grilled Vegetables and Lemon-Balsamic Vinaigrette’

Mom’s Famous Pumpkin Roll Up Cake

Serves 6 to 10

This is a recipe my wife has been making for years and years. We have no idea where she got it from. The only thing I know is that it’s delicious.
It is an easy cake to make. It looks really pretty once you sprinkle it with confectioner sugar. And it serves a lot of people.
Sounds like a near perfect dessert, assuming you like pumpkin (which I do!).
Enjoy.

Recipe follows.

Continue reading ‘Mom’s Famous Pumpkin Roll Up Cake’

Outrageous Baked Beans

Adapted from recipe found at http://www.justdutchovenrecipes.com

Makes about 1-1/2 quarts and serves lots of people; this recipe is easily doubled

As my family will testify to, I am not a big fan of taking the easy road when it comes to cooking.   If the recipe calls for lemon grass, go get some. If you are going to the trouble of making a home made pie, why not make your own pie dough? I believe there is something rewarding in mastering a recipe or getting a technique down just right. And, I believe that the end result tastes better. too.
Buy the best ingredients you can afford and use the best recipe you can find. Together these two things will deliver better results every time over anything store bought.
But, as with all rules, rules are made to be broken.
The follow recipe is one my wife found on the Internet and she gave it a try. It’s an “open-the-cans-and-dump-them-in” kind of recipe. It’s quick and easy.  And, it tastes amazing.
Every time we have made this recipe (usually we double it), family and guests leave nothing in the pot.
So even though this is an open and dump recipe, I highly recommend you give it a try.

Recipe follows.

Continue reading ‘Outrageous Baked Beans’

Why Chemists Do Not Write Cookbooks

I found this on the Internet and just about fell off my chair. I have no idea if this “recipe” is good or not but it shows just how geeky you can make just about anything. I had to share this with you all. Enjoy!

Chocolate Chip Cookies

Ingredients:
1. 532.35 cm3 gluten
2. 4.9 cm3 NaHCO3
3. 4.9 cm3 refined halite
4. 236.6 cm3 partially hydrogenated tallow triglyceride
5. 177.45 cm3 crystalline C12H22O11
6. 177.45 cm3 unrefined C12H22O11
7. 4.9 cm3 methyl ether of protocatechuic aldehyde
8. Two calcium carbonate-encapsulated avian albumen-coated protein
9. 473.2 cm3 theobroma cacao
10. 236.6 cm3 de-encapsulated legume meats (sieve size #10)

Direction
To a 2-L jacketed round reactor vessel (reactor #1) with an overall heat transfer coefficient of about 100 Btu/F-ft2-hr, add ingredients one, two and three with constant agitation. In a second 2-L reactor vessel (reactor#2) with a radial flow impeller operating at 100 rpm, add ingredients four, five, six, and seven until the mixture is homogenous. To reactor #2, add ingredient eight, followed by three equal volumes of the homogenous mixture in reactor #1.
Additionally, add ingredients nine and ten slowly, with constant agitation. Care must be taken at this point in the reaction to control any temperature rise that may be the result of an exothermic reaction. Using a screw extrude attached to a #4 nodulizer, place the mixture piece-meal on a 316SS sheet (300 x 600 mm). Heat in a 460K oven for a period of time that is in agreement with Frank & Johnston’s first order rate expression (see JACOS, 21, 55), or until golden brown. Once the reaction is complete, place the sheet on a 25C heat-transfer table, allowing the product to come to equilibrium.